Time line based on the transcription of the manuscript prepared by Mrs L Rosbottom 1989.


Tintinhull
939/946

    About this period in time, we find the first mention of St. Margaret’s Church by name The Church is dedicated to Margaret, a young girl from Antioch, Syria, who was cruelly martyred for her faith in the 3rd Century.  She was later Canonised.  She was one of the most revered Saints of the Middle Ages, in the West.

c. 1066
    Bishop Hobhouse said in his lecture, dated 1st Feb. 1883, that the manor, advowson and Hundred of Tintinhull was given at an early date, probably soon after the Conquest, by William of Normandy, to Robert Earl of Mortain, his half-brother.

1084
    The Exon Cadex, or Domesday Book, records:- “The Earl himself held TINTENHALIE.  The Church of Glastingberie (Glastonbury) held it in the time of King Edward.” (The Confessor.)  (It should be remembered that the Domesday Book contained only the names of Churches and Mills.  No other buildings were recorded.)

1086
    One tiny estate was probably, by this time, not in the Manor of Tintinhull, namely the estate of the Rector, known as THE PARSONAGE.  We know very little about the Rector’s estate.  It was worth only £7 in 1334 and was composed mostly of tithes and offerings from the parishioners, but there was a small amount of Glebe Land, and presumably a house for the Rector.

1091
    Charter of this date, drawn up by William, Earl of Mortain, and son of Earl Robert, refers to the Church of Tintinhull as part of the endowment for the upkeep of the Priory at Montacute, built for the Cluniac monks.

1100/1189
    Eleven charters were drawn up during these years, all concerning the upkeep of the Priory of Montacute.  They all contain a reference to the revenues of the Church at Tintinhull being part of the endowment for the upkeep of Montacute Priory.

1100/1135
    Reginald, Chancellor to King Henry 1 (1100/1135) enlarged the Monastery with buildings and possessions.  He also converted the remains of Earl Mortain’s castle or the Mount with a beautiful chapel “roofed all wyth stone, carved verye artyfycyallye, and dedicated to St. Mychell, vawted within with stayers made with stone from the fote (foot) of the hyll to the toppe.” (Cotton M.S. Julius F.vi.)
Walter ………. Was the first Prior of Montacute, in whose time the lands of the religious were taken away on account of the Founders’ Rebellion*, but were afterwards restored.  (Let. Itin ii 92)
* (William, Count of Mortain, was dispossessed of his Earldom and estates by King Henry 1 in 1104, when the Earl became a monk at Bermondsey Abbey and died without issue.  He was blind at his death.)

1174/5    The Church at Tintinhull is charged with a pension for the benefit of the Monks at Montacute, which continued until the year 1428.

1174    Thomas, Prior of Montacute, was elected Abbott of Hyde in Hampshire.

1180    Tintinhull Church is charged with a further sum for the benefit of the Sacristan, he being an officer at Montacute Priory who had charge of the sacred vessels and other moveables.

1184/1272    The Priory of Montacute and the Cluniac Monks continued to hold the Manor of Tintinhull, which included St. Margaret’s Church, as set out in the Charters of Count William Mortain and his successors, without dispute during these years.

C1200    Nikolaus Pevsner traced the history of buildings in south and west Somerset about 1961 and had the following to say about the Church of St. Margaret, Tintinhull.  (p.323):
Tintinhull.
ST. MARGARET.  V.M.  c. 13 century Church.  Nave, Chancel and slightly later north tower.  The tower rather bare, with higher stair-turret and parapet.  Angle buttresses at the foot.  On the third stage two lancets, on the fourth, three cusped lancets (with inserted Somerset tracery.)  The other windows preserved their c.13th century outline, but are filled with Perpendicular tracery.
Inside there is a typical roll-moulding all along the walls at window sill level and rising round doorways.
Chancel windows are shafted.
Tower, when it was built, blocked a shafted nave North window.
Double Piscina, with two pointed-trefoiled arches, reconstructed.
Chancel Arch stands on head corbels.  It looks early c 14th century.
South porch is Perpendicular, with a ribbed tunnel-vault inside.  The middle rib stands on wall-shafts.
Pulpit.  Jacobean, complete with back panelling and tester.
Bench-ends with perpendicular panels and flower.  (The Rev. W.V. Rushton kindly informs me that the Bench-ends were made in 1511.)
Rood Screen.  Part of the stone base preserved.
Plate.  Chalice and Cover dated 1635.
Monument.  Brass to John Heth, Priest, 1464.  Demi-figure 18 inches long.
Outside the porch the so-called ‘Stonying Door’ erected in 1515 by Prior Chard Montacute, who was also vicar of Tintinhull, with Latin inscriptions.
Churchyard Cross.  By Sir Ninian Comper. C,1920.  M.H.L.G.

1207    During this year ”the conventional church” was destroyed by fire.  (See Willis’ History of Abbies ii 199.)
‘Conventional Mass’ i.e. that which the Rectors of Cathedral and Collegiate Churches are bound to have celebrated every day, solemnly and with music after Tierce.  It must be applied for benefactors where religious orders of men are bound to celebrate the liturgy in Christ.  They too must have at least a low Mass daily according to the Office of the Day, which Mass is called ‘Conventional’.  (Ref. Cot. Dict. - Addis & Arnold.)


1208    Durand, who was Prior of Montacute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?) was expelled for ill behaviour.(!!!)

1218    Richard …… was the name of the first recorded Priest / Prior of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  The Prior and Convent of Montacute (Monte Acutis) were his patrons.

1242/43    The Prior of Montacute was challenged for taking tolls at Tintinhull, from the men of Exeter.

1260    At this date the Rev. Roger Norman was Prior of Montacute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?).

1274/94    During this period, the Rev. Philip Luvell was Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute).


1278    The Rev. Guy de Marchaunt was Prior of Montacute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?)

1280    The Burgesses of Ilchester complained that the “Thirteen Day’s Fair at Tintinhull” granted by Earl William Morton for the use of the Priory at Montacute, was detrimental to their trade.

1289    The Rev. Peter Gaudener was Prior of Montacute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?)
(1262)    Gilbert de Clare was born in 1262.  He married Joan Plantagenet on 2nd May 1290.
The reason that I have brought these two ancient families into my notes is that some old encaustic tiles have been inserted in the Sanctuary step at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  These old tiles bear the “Three Leopards” of the Plantagenets (1066/1485) and the “Chevrons of the Clares” (1066/1313) showing that at some early date there must have been a reason for putting them into this Church.
The Ancient family of Clare came into England as Richard Fitz-Gilbert, eldest son of Gilbert, Count of Berion of Sauci in Normandy, with his kinsman, William the Conqueror, in 1066.  After the conquest of England, Richard was awarded the Manor of Clare, Suffolk.  His descendants were known as Earls of Clare or “de Clare” until they obtained the English Earldoms of Hertford and Gloucester.  Richard Fitz-Gilbert was Chief Justice of England and died before 1090.
The direct line died out with Gilbert de Clare, earl of Hertford and Gloucester, who was slain at Bannockburn in 1313 and died without issue, when the Earldom became extinct.  The title was revived in 1624 when John Holles 1st Baron Haughton was created Earl of Clare, Suffolk, in 1624.  Their Arms were “Or, three chevrons, gules”.
The Ancient family of Plantagenet took their surname from a sprig of broom (Planta = plant.  Genesta = broom.).  The Plantagenet family was founded by Geoffrey of Anjou.  He married Matilda, daughter of King Henry I of England, on 3 April 1127 as her second husband.  Joan (who was married to Gilbert de Clare on 2 May 1290) was the daughter of King Edward I of England.  She was born at Acre, on the coast of what is today called Israel.  Her marriage to Gilbert de Clare ended at this death on 7th Dec. 1295.  She married, secondly, Ralph de Monthermer, to whom she brought the titles of Hertford and of Gloucester.  Joan Plantagenet died on 23rd April 1307, leaving issue by her second marriage.
Another suggestion regarding the reason for these ancient tiles being inserted in the Sanctuary step at St. Margaret’s Church is that they are the arms of Edmund, Earl of Cornwall and nephew of King Henry !!! (1216/72).  Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, was also Lord of the Manor of Ilchester / Ivelchester, a small town a few miles from Tintinhull.  Edmund married the daughter of Richard Clare, Earl of Gloucester, but we do not have the name of the bride nor the date of the marriage.
One wonders why these ancient tiles were built into St. Margaret’s Church at Tintinhull, as it seems unlikely that either of the two royal marriages mentioned above would have been solemnised at St. Margaret’s Church, but rather at either Winchester or Salisbury.  Would the fact that Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, had among his titles that of ‘Lord of the Manor of Ilchester’ be sufficient to account for this?  Why were they not put into the church at Ilchester?  At one time there were five churches there.
Another possible explanation it that these ancient tiles were purloined by an early Rector of St. Margaret’s as an enrichment.  It is not known at what date they were installed - possibly in the Victorian Restoration of St. Margaret’s Church in 1883.*
* The Rev. John Collinson, writing in his book “The History of Somerset” in 1791, refers to the Arms shown on the “Grand Arch at Montacute Priory …. Show that the Priory was well favoured and patronised by several of the House of Lancaster.”

1291    The Rectory (Parsonage?) was valued at £16 per annum this year.


1292    The Rev. Godfrey de la Doufe was elected to be Prior of Montacute in the year (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?).  The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute) were his patrons.

1293    The Rev. John de Castria (Chester?) was Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute) were his patrons.  He was a Clerk to the King’s Bench.

1295    The Rev. Stephen Paulis, alias Rowland, was Priest / Prior of Montacute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?).  The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute) were his patrons.

1313    The Rev. Will. De Modeford* was Incumbent of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull - 4 Feb 1313.  The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute) were his patrons.
* Mudford is a village outside Yeovil on the way to Queen Camel.

1316    The manor of Tintinhull was still in the hands of the Priory of Montacute and the Cluniac monks there, who were returned again this year, were recorded as holding the ‘Manor in Chief’.


1319    In this year the Monks at Montacute Priory leased Wellham’s Mill in Tintinhull to Walter and Maude de Welnham.  These leases had rights to carry mill stones and large timbers for the repair of the mill, when required.

1334    In this year the Rector’s estate at Tintinhull was valued at only £7, which  was probably an under-estimate.  It was comprised most of tithes, corn and parish offerings, but there as also a small amount of Glebe land, and also presumably a house for the Rector of Tintinhull.
It is not known at what date a house for the Rector of Tintinhull was provided.  By inference, however, we can be fairly sure that in the later Middle Ages (circa 1400) the Rector lived on the south side of the Churchyard of St. Margaret’s, where the principal range of Tintinhull Court has a basic medieval plan.

1344    The Rev. Adam de Newbold was Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His patron was King Edward III.  (1328/77) The King was guardian of William de Montacute* (later Earl of Salisbury**) during William’s minority.
*  William de Montacute, 4th Baron Montacute, was created Earl of Salisbury 16th March 1337 and died 1343.  His son, William de Montacute, 5th Baron, succeeded him and was one of the Founders of the Order of the Garter.  The 5th Baron died in 1397, s.p.s.
**  Earls of Salisbury.  See 1460, Robert de Montacute.  See 20 March 1539 re Earls of Salisbury.

1346    It was during the Middle Ages that the Crown took advantage of its occasional Patronage Rights to appoint Government Clerks, such as the diplomat Richard de Sarum, who unsuccessfully intruded in 1346.

1348    The Rev. Will. De Bolton was Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church. Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute).

1350    Stocks were placed in Tintinhull village green by an act of Parliament.
(New stocks were erected in 1721 and were repaired in 1933. They are immediately outside the gates leading into St. Margaret’s Churchyard, Tintinhull. (1988))

7 April 1350    The Rev. Roger de Feriby was installed as incumbent of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, on the presentation of William de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury. (See 1344, when the Earl of Salisbury was under the guardianship of King Edward III.)

1362    The name of the Rev. Gerald Rocke occurs as Prior of Montacute. In this same year the name of “the Rev. William Croke, Parson” was Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull. (I wonder if there could be a mistake in the transcription of the two men, and it should have been the same? If so, they may have been brothers.)

1379/1406    During these years the disputed ownership of the Manor of, and hundred of Tintinhull dragged on, until it was finally settled in 1406, when it became the undisputed property of the Priory and Cluniac Monks of Montacute, where it remained until the dissolution of the Monastery in 1539. It should be remembered that the Church of St. Margaret at Tintinhull was part of the “Manor of Tintinhull.”

1382    The Rev. John de Stone was incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.
King Richard II (1377/1399) was his Patron.
(See ‘Thursday . . . 1416 and Oct. 1416.)

1384    The Rev. Francis ---- was Prior of Montacute
(and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull?).

1390    “The Fabric Rolls” of Wells Cathedral contain the account of John Bonyngton, written in Latin, under the head “Obligations 1390” when he answers for £4.16s.7_d “received from the box of Sir Ralph Erghum,* late Bishop, as set forth by Indenture between JOHN TYNTENHULL** and John Bonyngton.”
* “1388 Ralph Erghum.
   Translated from Salisbury to Bath & Wells 3 Apl.1388. Died 10 Apl.1400.”
**  John Tyntenhull. This was probably John Gower who was incumbent of Tintinhull in 1391, or John Stone the earlier incumbent.

1391    The Rev. John Gower was Incumbent of St.Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.
King Richard II. (1377/1399) was his Patron. (See 1419 – William Gore.)

1395    The Rev. John Stone was (again) the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull. King Richard II, (1377/1399) was his Patron. (See 1382)

1399/1412    King Henry IV. (1399/1412) made denison or naturalised and enfranchised the Monks at Montacute Priory, who were of the order of Cluniac Monks from Clugny in the Diocese of Masoon in Normandy, brought over by Earl William Mortain for his newly built Priory at Montacute.

1406    The dispute regarding the ownership of the Manor and Hundred of Tintinhull between the Lovell family and the Prior and Cluniac Monks of Montacute, was finally resolved in this year. The disputed lands then remained with the Prior and Monks until the dissolution of the Monastery in 1539, when the lands passed to the Crown. (These lands included the Rectory, or “Parsonage” which were then leased to Dr. William Petrie.)

1416    The churchwardens’ accounts of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, date from this year. (The parish registers do not begin until 1561. They are all kept at the Somerset County Record Office, Taunton.) (See 1432/1435.)

1416    On Thursday the Morrow of St. Calixtus the Pope. A.D.1416

I John Stone rector of the Parish Church of Tintenhulle in the Diocese of Bath and Wells make my Will in this manner:-
I bequeath my body to be buried in the Chancel* of the Church aforesaid.
To fabric and ornaments of said Church 20s. To the fraternity of the light (luminis) of the Blessed Mary** in said Church 20s. To fabric of  the Cathedral Church of Wells 6s.8d. To fabric of the Chapel at Preston*** 6s.8d. To William George of Tintenhulle 6s.8d. To John Merscheton of same and his wife 6s.8d. To the children of a Welshman (Wallicus) dwelling there next Merscheton 6s.8d. To the wife of Roger Smythe of same place, one black cow in keeping with Roger. To each poor person now in the Almshouse at Yeuele (Yeovil) 6s.8d. To Ellen Gylbys of Tintenhulle 6s.8d. To the Bedeman* (oratori) of Tintenhulle that he may pray for my soul whenever he passes, praying through the town (orando transieri per villam) 6s.8d. To John Sparwe 40s.so that he be a kind friend and counsellor of my executors underwritten. To John Passware and his wife 40s. To the two serving women (duabus servieatibus) of said John 13s.4d. To Robert Gore** 20s. To sir Henry Gilbert, chaplain 6s.8d. To Sir Henry, chaplain at Preston*** 6s.8d. To John Bardolphe, chaplain 5s. To Thomas Stawmpford (Stampford) chaplain 5s. And of this will I Make John Passeware and Robert Gore** my Exors. Any residue and my rents in the Church*** to the houses of God and the maintenance of the poor in the Almshouse at Yeuele (Yeovil) lately founded.
Proved 21 Nov. 1416 (Somerset Medieval Wills, edited by the Rev F.W.Weaver, Milton-Clevedon Vicarage, Somerset. May 190?
Montacute Priory of Saints Peter and Paul 22 148 199. (37 Marche fo.289.)
*     “ . . buried in the Chancel . .” A brass tablet on the floor of St Margaret’s Church, next to the Altar refers to his burial.
**     “Blessed Mary”. See 1437, “Pro Bonus St. Mary.”
***  Preston. This was a village outside the town of Yeovil, but has now(1988) been incorporated into the town of Yeovil.
*    Bedeman. One paid or endowed to pray for others.
**    Robert Gore. An Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull was called John   Gower, and in 1418 William Gore was the incumbent.
*** “. . . rents in the Church . . .” It is not clear whether he refers only to rents from St. Margaret’s Church or not. Also whether they are to go to which ‘houses of God.’ He mentions Wells Cathedral, St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull and Preston Chapel in his will.



24 Oct. 1416.    A memorial brass at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, placed on the floor immediately next to the sanctuary steps reads:- “His jacet John Stone, quondam Rector huius rectie, qui obit XXIV die mense Octobrie anno Dim MCCCCXVI. Cuis sie impietur ds amie” which is translated:- “Here lies John Stone formally Rector of this rectory, who died on the 24th day of October in the year of our Lord 1416. On whose spirit the Lord have mercy. Amen,”
(See letters dated 3 Feb.1883 and 16 Feb.1883.)

27 Oct. 1416.    The Rev. Will Benet was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull at this date. The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis, (Montacute) were his patrons.

3 Nov. 1416.    The rev. John (Archer) was summoned, as Prior of Montecute (and Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull

1418.    The Rev. William Gore was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.
The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montecute) were his patrons.
(see 1391 – John Gower. See 1416 – Will of the Rev. John Stone re. Thomas and Robert Gore. Were they all of the same family?)

1428.    The Rectory at Tintinhull was valued at £16 per annum in this year. Up to this date St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull had been charged with the cost of a pension for the Monks at Montecute Priory, but it ceased in 1428.

13 May 1428.    The Rev. John Towker (Tucker) was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull. The Prior and Convent of Monta Acutis (Montacute) were his Patrons.
The Bishop’s* Register gives his surname as “Bishop”.
*  John Stafford, Dean of Wells, Lord Treasurer. Consecrated as Bishop of Bath & Wells 27 May 1425. Translated from Bath & Wells by Bull dated 13 May 1443 to Archbishop of Canterbury. Died 25 May 1452.

1 Sept. 1429.    The Rev. John Wodeword was the Incumbent of St. St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull for a period of four years. The Prior and Convent of Monte Acutis (Montacute) were his Patrons.

1432/35    
The Accounts of the Churchwardens of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, begin here and end in 1678. A few parts were written in English, but most are in clerical Latin. These have been translated. They tell us much about the fabric of the Church, and details of the most important structural alterations that went on from time to time. Consequently many of the dates of the items built or restored or pulled down in the Church, can be dated exactly, and even their cost known.
Little is now known about the Church fabric before these Accounts were started, but they show us the main sources of income for the Churchwardens, which were:-Hire of the Bake-House; Brew-House and Church-House; gifts of money or livestock; bequests and the Church Ales.
I have taken the following information regarding items in the Churchwarden Accounts from several sources, and in some case the dates of the various entries do not entirely agree.
The sources are:-
The Somerset Record Society Proceedings for 1890. Ref; iv 175/207.
The Lecture of the Rev. J.B.Hyson, Vicar of Tintinhull, dated 29 Nov. 1883.
The Lecture of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Hobhouse dated 1st Feb. 1883.
An article of the Rev. W.G.Saunders dated 1st Jan. 1932 entitled “South Somerset
Churches”.
University of Bristol, Dept. of Extra-Mural Studies, dated . . . . .?
I have put all the above different records into chronological order as nearly as was
possible.

MONEY TABLE FROM THE MIDDLE AGES
1 Farthing. Usually written _d        = one quarter of one (old) penny.
1d (1 Denarius)        = one old penny.
12d (12 pence)        = 1 shilling; (value 5p. in 1988)
20s (20 shillings)        = £1. (libre) one pound/one sovereign.
6s.8d. (six shillings and eight pence)        = one third of £1. known as 1 noble.
                                                                                  (value 33p in 1988)
13s.4d. (thirteen shillings and fourpence)        = two thirds of £1. known as 1 mark.
                                                                                  (value 67p in 1988)
Most large sums of money were described in the Middle Ages (C.1400) as “Marks” rather than “pounds” or “sovereigns” although no Mark coin ever existed.







1433.    The Churchwardens’ Accounts record:-
Spent in waxlight        3s.10d.
Spent on the Visitation        6s.00d.
Spent on binding an original (Ministerial function)        0s.10d.
Spent in washing the veils        0s.01d.
Spent in cord        0s.07d.
Spent in laten box for placing the Corpus Christi        10s.00d.
Paid to John the Chaplain
          for celebrating the souls of the benefactors. (John Wodeward)        0s.08d.
Receipts for collection for waxlight, a brewing and a gift        30s.02d.
Sale of a bullock        1s.00d.
For a bullock delivered to Jno. Helyer        2s.00d.
For a cow delivered to Jno. Smythe of Ash        2s.00d.
Ditto delivered to Jno.Gylle
(see 1433 re J. Gylle the “Collector” of the King’s XVth. Henry VI 1429 and
deposed in 1471)    
For oil and clouting leather        0s.02d.
For hemmying alter cloth    
For making the Common Oven (i.e. the Bake-House oven)        31s. 08d
For a capon        0s.03d.
Hire of a cow 2d. and from her hide when dead        1s.00d.
Profits of Bake-House for two years of Wm. Penday    
Profits de Bonis St. Maria hoc a        6s.8d.
A Chalice        30s.00d.
A Cross of copper gilt        20s.00d.
For washing altar clothes and kerchiefs of the inmates and for mending
   Churchyard wall. (Walls of timber frame filled in with wattle and daub)        3.06s.01d.
Sale of a calf        2s.04d.
Hire of a cow    
Cow and calf bought for        1s.01d.

22 Jan. 1433/4.    The Rev. John Heth. Feb. 16. The Bishop* having regard to the poverty of the benefice (i.e. St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull) commanded a Commission to be directed to Master John Barnard to make Inquisition as to the right of Patronage in respective of the presentation by the Prior and Convent of Montacute, of John Heth, Clerk to the Parish Church of Tyntenhulle. See 3 Feb. 1464/5.)
*the Bishop. The Rt. Rev. John Stafford. (See 13 May 1428.)

It seems that it was the Rev. John Heth who arranged for all his Churchwardens to keep an Account of all their outgoings and incoming expenses. (See 1946 re. Mr. Estcourt Southcombe’s letter to the Western Gazette.)    

1433/4.    The Churchwardens’ Accounts record:-
IN STOCK.
A Cow, a Bull and a Ewe.
One Cow in stock, value 10s.
100lbs of lead, sold to the steward. (Procurator) of the Brotherhood
of St. Mary, Tyntenhill.
Gift of a girdle (Zona*) of green silk.
A Bequest of beans and wheat.
(I wonder why the Chalice and Cross of copper gilt, bought the year before, are not included in the Inventory?)

An alabaster slab for the High Altar        26s.08d.
Two ditto, ditto per perochiancs (Parishioners?)        10s.08d.
One cow sold for 6s. after her year’s hiring at        2s.00d.
An alabaster slab sold to Robt. Shearne        1s.00d.
The bull. (i.e. his flesh) sold to divers people        5s.00d.
A flesher (carnifex) for slaying and distributing the bull        0s.03d.
Bequest from Friar Bartholomew of Ilchester        3s.04d.
Profit from a Christmas play by five parishioners        6s.08d.
From J. Gylle the collector of the King’s XVth.
(See 1433 re cow delivered to Jno Gylle)    
For a new ‘Rode Lofe@ (Rude Loft) Wardens to find the materials,
service and meat etc    
Contract with a carpenter for his skill        40s.00d.
40 new ‘Indaces for Rood-Loft’ (i.e. Pieces of wood which were
connected with uprights)        0s.03d.
Hive of Bees. (A legacy)        0s.03d.



1510    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
For a Grail, Kalendar, Portuas and a Mass book     

1510    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-                    
To carpenter for sawing of tymber for seats for ye Church and for cutting and framyng part of the same. (See 1511/12)

16th century    Freeholds in ‘stockett’ with rights in ‘Tintinhull West Field’ may indicate the position of the Tintinhull earlier estate.  The estate formed when Montacute Priory appropriated the Rectory in Tintinhull about the year 1528 or 1529, with whom it remained until the Dissolution of the Monastery in 1539.

1511/12    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Bench Ends with Canopy to the pews were carved with panels and flowers     
(See 1511 and C. 1560)
(I think the above reference to ‘Bench Ends with Canopy’ must refer to the hinged seats, outside, but attached to the pews, a few of which remain to the present day.)

1513    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
For paving the Church        1s.06d.
(Could this have been the period when the old Plantagent/Clare tiles were introduced into St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, and placed where they now lie on the Sanctuary step leading up to the Altar?)

1515    The Rev Thomas Chard was Prior of Monte Acutis (Montacute) and was summoned, as Prior to the Convention.
(Chard is a small town a few miles distant from Tintinhull).

1516    The Church Warden’s Accounts record:-
Repairs to the Churchyard wall     
(See 1518/19)
Paid to the painter     
For painting of the King’s Crown (King Henry VIII (1509/46)         16s.11d
For making of the West Window in the Tower    
For raising the Tower and Turret staircase         £10.10s.00d

1516/17    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The top stage of the Tower and the North East stair Turret were added when the stairs to the Bell Tower were made.
A door head to the ‘Stonying Door’ was made.  (See 1518/19)

1517    The Rev. Robert Cryche was the Incumbent of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.
His Patrons were ……… (None were recorded but it is fairly safe to assume that the Prior and Convent of Montacute were his Patrons, as they had been in the past.)

1518/19    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Expenses in connection with the Eastern Churchyard Boundary Wall.
(It would appear that the repairs to the wall, made in 1516, were not sufficient, and it was decided to make a thorough job of it in 1518/19.)
100 foot of coping stone         20s.00d.
Making of the wall         19s.00d.
Stuff for making of the ‘Stonyng Door’         8s.00d.
Lime for same work         4s.08d.
Making of the hatch         2s.03d.
8 loads of stone from the Hill (Ham Hill)         0s.16d.
2 loads from Castell (Montacute Castle ruins)        0s.12d.
Total paid out by the Rector* and allowed to him by the wardens        57s.09d.
*The Rector was either the Rev. Thomas Chard, Rector in 1515 & 1521 or Rev. Robert Cryche, Rector in 1517.

26 Aug 1521    The Rev. Thomas Cherd/Chard, who had been Prior of Monte Acutis (Montacute) from
1515 was now the Incumbent of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patrons were the
Rev. Ric. Bere, Abbas of Glastonbury A.C., per Priorem, and the Convent of Monte
Acutis (Montacute).
The Rev. Thomas Chard is thought to have been the man responsible for having the
‘Stonyng Door’ built at St. Margaret’s Church, either in his capacity as Prior of
Montacute or as the future Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.
There have been many conjectures as to how the ‘Stonyng Door’ received its name, but I
think it was nothing more than a ‘Stone Door’ set into the Eastern Boundry wall of the
Churchyard, to gain entrance, mainly because the cost of it is included in the expenses of
building this wall.
The ‘Stonyng Door’ now stands to the South West of the Church, and in the
Churchyard.  It was built from some of the ruins of the old Castle at Montacute, which
had been built by Earl Robert Mortain circa 1080.  One Historian writes: ‘The Stonyng
Door came from the ruins of the Castle of Montacute which for some reason, the Prior,
was anxious to preserve.’  However, I do not think it was an act of sentiment, but rather
one of thrift.  As the next Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, he knew
where cheap stone from a nearby source could be obtained, and so arranged it.
It will be seen that the ‘Stonyng Door’ had a ‘door head’ added in 1516/17, and as the
Church Accounts include the cost of building the ‘Stonyng Door’ with those of repairs
to the Eastern Boundry Wall, it would seem that the ‘Stonyng Door’ was incorporated
into this wall, but was removed to its present (1988) position at a later date.  It may have
been when the wall in which it stood had to undergo a further repair.
When the ‘Stonyng Door’ was removed to its present position, it was placed the wrong
way round, possibly because there was nobody locally who could read the Latin
inscriptions carved into both sides of it.
On one’s way out of the Church you are faced with the Latin inscription, in Gothic
letters:-  IN DOMU DMI LETANTES HUIE’ – the translation being:- ‘Let us go into
the House of the Lord rejoicing.’
On the other side of the door one reads:- VERE LOCUM SANCTUS EST’ which
translates:- ‘Truly this is a Holy place.’
Although Glastonbury Abbey had exchanged their Manor and Hundred of Tintinhull for
Count Robert Mortain’s Manor of Camerton nearly five hundred years earlier in 1080,
the Abbott of Glastonbury still appears to have had ‘a say in the matter’ as he ‘presented
the Prior of Montacute, Thomas Chard’, ie who was himself!
Thomas Chard was both Rector and Prior of Montacute, and also Prior of Carswell in
Devon.  He was also a Bishop, serving as Suffragan* in the Diocese of both Wells and
Exeter.  He was also Bishop of Selymbris**.
*Suffragan.    I could not find any reference to Suffragan Bishops in the Diocese of
Wells or Exeter at this date of 1521.
**Selymbris. I could not find this in any map I have. It may be an Honorary Benefice
awarded by the Pope for good service. During the Middle Ages, a Suffragan Bishop
took his title from an obscure Irish Diocese or from a remote part of the civilised world.

1521        The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
A door head to the ‘Stonyng Door’was made.  (See 1516/17)

1521    About this date, the Rev. Thomas Chard built the Priory Gatehouse at Montacute and may also have been responsible for altering the Rectory house at Tintinhull (The Parsonage).  In some sense he was both Lord of the Manor and Rector, so that the house* could thus claim then to have been  the ‘Manor House of Tintinhull’ (ref Dr  R  Dunning, Editor of the ‘Victoria County History of Somerset’)
*Tintinhull Court.

1521    It was at this period that Montacute Priory/Convent was licensed to appropriate the remaining revenues, provided that a Vicarage was built for the Incumbent, who was given a stipend of £10 a year,  and what had been the Rectory or Parsonage passed to the Prior and Convent of Montacute, who may have let it or used it for themselves.

1528/29    The Prior of Montacute became the permanent Rector of Tintinhull, when an acre of meadow with orchard, garden and close, was allotted to the Vicar.

1529/32    About this period, the Rev. Thomas Chard probably occupied the Parsonage, but ceased to have care of the Parish of Tintinhull, and a Vicar was appointed, though the Vicarage was still being served by the Monks in 1532.  (Ref. ‘Proceedings of the Somerset Arch. Society 87.  Quoting the abstract of title of the Parsonage.)
The Vicar was ordained and was to receive from the Improprietor £10 gross and £9.8s.7d  nett, which he continued to be paid through the seventeenth century.

1529/32    A house was assigned to the Vicar of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, about this period.

1530    The Ecclesiastical Authorities state that the Rectory of Tintinhull was appropriated to the Priory of Montacute in this year and that the sum of £10 per annum was charged to the Priory for the Vicar’s stipend.  
(This sum  of £10 per annum was still being paid, and is referred to at the sale of Tintinhull Court Estate under Lot 48 and dated 30th May 1913.)

1531    A stone house was built to replace the Church House built in 1497, to house the Brew-House and Bake-House.  (It was enlarged in 1533 when it reached its full extent.)

1534    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The South Porch of the Church, originally Saxon, was rebuilt. (see 1441/2)
For stone (brought from) Hardington, for the Porch        5s.04d.
(Hardington is a small village near East Coker and Odcombe)
For the porch        6s.03d.
For the plumber for mending the lead of the Church        7s.00d.
(Probably lead on the Church roof)

1535    After appropriating the Parsonage, the holding of Montacute Priory in Tintinhull, was valued at £88.13s.3_d.
Of the £88.13s.3_d., over £64 came from the rents of free and customary tenants, of whom there were two free and fifty eight customary tenants.  Both demesne and Rectory were let to farm (presumably by Montacute Priory) the former for £23.17s.00d., and the latter for £64.16s3_d.
Until appropriation, the Parsonage House was the residence of the Rector and was let at the time of the Dissolution of Montacute Priory in March 1539, to Sir John Cuffe, farmer of the tithes.  (His son held it in 1559.)

1535    The Incumbent of St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was now called a ‘Vicar’.  One of the main roads through the village of Tintinhull, is called ‘Vicarage Street’, but the Glebe house in this road is called ‘The Rectory’.

1535    Tithes and other dues were valued at £18 and were farmed for that sum.

1536    A valuation was made by King Henry VIII.  (1509/1546) for the purpose of raising Taxes and the Rectory/Parsonage was valued at £18 nett and the Vicarage at £10 nett.

20 Mar.1539    The Rev. Robert Whitelock was the last Prior of Montacute,  and it was he who surrendered his Priory to King Henry VIII.  Another Historian gives the name of the  last Prior as the Rev. Robert Sherborne, who lived at The Chantry from 1532 until 1539, and whose initials can still be seen on the gabled end of the house.
(The Chantry is situated at the entrance to the present Montacute House in Middle Street.  Before the present (1988) Village School, opened in 1847, The Chantry was used as the School,, and then became the village Post Office until 1954, when the present Post Office was built.)
( The Clunic Monks built a ‘Monk’s House’ at the opposite end of Bishopston to The Prior (and on the left as you drive down to Montacute from Tintinull.)  The Monks House is thought to have been used as a Hospital and consequently was built some way from The Priory to stop the spread of infection.  It still (1988) has its own water supply.)

20 Mar.1539    The Priory of Montacute was surrendered in the presence of thirteen Monks, of whom the names of eleven have remained to this day.  They were:-  Robert Warren, Thomas  Taunton,  William Draper, John Crabbe, John Webbe, William Winter, John  Pouley,   John Roberts, John Skyner and William Crese.
The Prior was given a yearly pension of eighty pounds, allowed to him, with a gratuity of twenty pounds and the Capital messuage of East Chinnock, which is about eight miles to the south of Tintinhull, towards Crewkerne, in which to live.
The Monks had free-warren here, or the right to preserve and hunt in a stated area anything furred or feathered, except deer and boar, as well as ‘Cock and Sack’ ie the privilege of holding Courts,  trying causes and imposing fines, as in a Manor Court.
Toll and Theam, Infangtheof/infangnetaef – the right of a Manor Court or a Borough Court to judge a thief caught within its area of jurisdiction and all other liberties and free customs within their borough and Hundreds of Montacute, Tintinhull, Houndsborough, Creech, Leigh and Frifeham in Devonshire.  They were exempt from all secular jurisdictions, exactions, impositions and taxes wherever, throughout England.
It appears by their Arms,  affixed to the Grand Arch at Montacute – possibly the same as the ‘the Priory Gatehouse’ build by Thomas Chard at Montacute in 1515 – and other remains of the Monastery,  still existing (1791) near the parish Churchyard, in ancient and venerable magnificence, that they were favoured and patronised by several of the House of Lancaster.  (See p.3/4 re. The Plantagenet/Clare tiles in St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.)
The society (who having been originally subject to the Monks of Clugy in the Diocese of Masoon in Normandy) were made denison, ie naturalised and enfranchised by King Henry IV (1399/1412).
(In the year 1360, the ‘Traite d’Bretigny’ was signed to establish for good what lands in France belonged to the English Kings, and what to the French Kings.  Normandy went to France, whilst Calis, Le Quercy, Le Ponthieu and Gascony etc came to the English Crown.)

Mar.1539    The revenues of Montacute Priory were rated at £456.13s.7_. and the Rectory and
the Rectorial tithes were secularised, and The Parsonage passed to the Crown
(Henry VIII).

1539.    Until the Dissolution of Montacute Priory in 1539, the Advowson of Tintinhull belonged to that Priory.  As a Cluniac House, however, its property was seized several times during the 14th century by the Crown, which then exercised the Patronage itself, or granted it to the Earls of Salisbury.  (See 1346).

Sr. William Petre, who later became Sir William Petre, and was Secretary of State, was responsible for procuring the surrender of many of the Monasteries, including that at Montacute, and helped himself liberally to Church lands, particularly in his native Devon and Somerset.

The Priory of Montacute had retained the Manor of Tintinhull from 1406 (when the long drawn out dispute between them and the Lovell and Seymour families was finally settled over the ownership of the Manor) until the Dissolution of the Monastery in 1539.


1540.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
A King’s Proclamation (Henry VIII) orders that a Bible of the largest volume is to be provided by the Curate and the parishioners, under a penalty of 40s. per month.
This was Cranmer’s great Bible, which was a corrected edition of Matthew’s Bible.  Cranmer wrote a Preface to it.


1541.    The Church Warden’s Accounts record:-
For half price of a Bible bought this year        6s.08d.
A Chaynet (Chain) to hold the Bible        0s.03d.
One new clocke bought        33s.04d


1542.    In this year the Rectory was reduced from its value in 1291, and in 1428 of £16 per
annum, to £9.9s.0d.


1542.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Margaret Crotte paid for he Knell to be rongee (rung)        0s.04d


1543.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The Bible seems to have been suppressed in this year.


1546/59.    The Parsonage House, until appropriation, the residence of the Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was let to Sir John Cuffe, farmer of the tithes.  (Presumably collector of the tithes).  (See 1539)


1546/53.    During the reign of King Edward VI (1546/53) there was a Cell at Montacute Priory called ‘Bablew’ or ‘Balbew’ – the site of which belonged to John Lyte of Lyte’s Carey, Co. Somerset.


1558.    During this year the holding in Tintinhull, belonging to Montacute Priory increased to the sum of £77.


1559.    The nett income of the Impropriator was £7.9s.1_d.  The Advowson was expressly exempted from the Grant of the Parsonage Estate in this year. (This may be the reason why the Napper family were so careful to record on their Memorial tablets in
St. Margaret’s Church, that they were the owners of the advowson.)

 

1559/60.    The Tintinhull Fair was no longer worth anything to the assets of Montacute Priory.  (It had been part of the benefits given by Earl William Mortain for the up-keep of his Priory of Montacute in 1091.)


1559.    Nicholas Napper, who died in 1579, purchased the Rectorial lands from the Crown in 1559, for the sum of £237.


1560.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The Bench-Ends of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, date from about this period.  These are the bench-ends of the pews.  (See 1511/12.)


1561.    The site and lands of the old Montacute Priory, and presumably the Hundreds that went with it, including the Hundred of Tintinhull, were granted to Sir William Petre, and sold by him to Mr. Robert Freke, from whom it was soon after purchased by the family of Phelips, who at that time possessed some other parts of the Manor.  (This is the family of Phelips who owned Montacute House at one time.  A house they built in about 1588.)


1561.    This is the year that the St. Margaret’s Church Parish Registers begin.  However, there is a gap in the Registration of Baptisms between the years 1607 -1610.  (These Church Registers should not be confused with the Churchwarden’s Accounts.)
When the Napper family became Lay Rectors of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, they lived at the Parsonage.  They carved their Arms above the main door to the house.


26 Sep. 1566.    The Rev. Ric. Loughe was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was Queen Elizabeth.  (See 1539 re Crown Patronage)


1568.    The Rev. Richard Loughe, the Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was reported as being non-resident in 1568.  It was stated that no quarterly sermons had been preached, and the fabric of the Church needed attention.


1568.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Bishop’s Bible was published, and was purchased in the same year.  (See 1576).


3 April 1571.    The Rev. Geo. Johnson was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was Queen Elizabeth. (1559/1603)


12 April 1571.    Sir William Petre made his Will and gave to the poor of Tintinhull and Montacute the sum of £6.13.4d.  (Pat. 33 Hen.VIII.p.6.)


1571.    The Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, the Rev. Geo. Johnson claimed to have suffered ‘open wrong’ because the Improprietor would not pay ‘tenths and subsidies’ originally agreed.
(A tithe was a tenth part of anything, but especially that of the profits and stock of parishioners, due, under Canon law, to their Incumbent for his support.  The Tithe system in England was first mentioned in the year 747).




12 April 1571.    Sir William Petre made his Will and gave to the poor of Tintinhull and Montacute the sum of £6.13.4d.  (Pat. 33 Hen.VIII.p.6.)


1571.    The Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, the Rev. Geo. Johnson claimed to have suffered ‘open wrong’ because the Improprietor would not pay ‘tenths and subsidies’ originally agreed.
(A tithe was a tenth part of anything, but especially that of the profits and stock of parishioners, due, under Canon law, to their Incumbent for his support.  The Tithe system in England was first mentioned in the year 747).


1576.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Bishop’s Bible was purchased, which had been published in the same year.  (See 1568)


15 Aug. 1576.    The Rev. Jno. Knyght was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was entered as ‘Nicholas Napper, yeoman of Tyntenhull’.


25 Sep. 1579.    Nicholas Napper made his Will:- ‘To be buried in the Chancel of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull’.  He left money to the poor of Tintinhull and Montacute.


24 Dec. 1579.    Nicholas Napper died.


28 Dec. 1579.    A Memorial Brass was let into the floor of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, being the third from the Sanctuary steps, which reads:- ‘Here lies the body of Nicholas Napper, Proprietor of the Rectory and Parsonage of this Parish who was buried 28 December 1579’.  (See 1599).


18 Mar. 1580.    The Rev. Jon. Lorrimer was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patrons were entered as ‘Joc. and Thos. Napper, Yeomen’.  This refers to John Napper and Thomas Napper (1).


1586/7.    The Montacute Priory Court Rolls, books and documents, survive only from 1539 when the Dissolution of the Priory was ordered by King Henry VIII.  One assumes the earlier ones were destroyed.


1593.    The Rev. John Lorrimer, Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was crushed to death under a collapsing Linhay.  This was the name used in the south of England in dialect from, for a Farm-Shed or out-buildings open along the front.


7 July 1593.    The Rev. Will. Chaffie was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was Thomas Napper (1).



1596/7.    An acre of land on Tintinhull Moor was assigned to the Church House.





12 Feb. 1601    The Rev. Fran. Williams was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was Thomas Napper (1).  (He being the eldest son of Nicholas Napper who died 25 Dec. 1579).


1602    The Church Bell, No.4 at St Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was thus dated and inscribed:- (Cast by) ‘Robert Wiseman of Montacute; Give thanks to God.  A.D. 1602’.
Although this is the earliest record of the Church bells, it is numbered ‘No.4’ as it is tuned to the treble pitch.  All Church bells being numbered according to their pitch, and not their date.


15 Nov. 1606.    The Rev. Abr. Drewe was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was Thomas Napper (1).  (He was buried 23 Sept. 1626).


1608.    The Rev. Edward Robarts, clerk, was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was presumably Thomas Napper (1) but no name is recorded as Patron.


13 Sept. 1609.    The Rev. Adam Farneham was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull until his death in 1646.  His Patron was presumably Thomas Napper (1) though no name is recorded as Patron.  
Note that it is this Adam Farneham who signs the Churchwarden’s Accounts in 1645 for the last time.
(In the year 1661 a Thomas Farneham was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Possibly a son or grandson of Adam Farneham?).



1609.    The Rev. Giles Flint presented by virtue of a Grant from Thomas Napper (1).


1609.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts report:-
Church Ales proved an income for the Parish of Tintinhull until this date.


1610.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Two Wardens and three Overseers leased some waste land from the Lord of the Manor, near the Church House, on which to build.  (This was probably to build the Poor House.  (See 1745 re Paupers).


1611.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The Parishioners were responsible for repairing the road through their Parish from Tintinhull Forts to Ilchester.  This was the old Fosse Way now the A.303.  (1988)
See 1753.


1612.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-

The Churchwardens were presented for not having a copy of Jewel’s Works.  They had acquired one by the following year.


 

1612/22.    The Manor Court Registers during these dates were with the Tintinhull Church documents.  (Those from 1622/1875 were held by Mr. Henry Southey Howard at Tintinhull Court during his life there.  He bought the Court through his wife, Dorothy nee Croshall who came from Chislehurst, Kent, on 23rd Nov. 1927.  He died on the 17th Oct. 1959).
The Manor Court Registers which had begun in 1612 and, except for a few years during the Cromwellian period of 1640/60 – are complete up to the year 1885 when the Manor Courts ceased to exist.  These Courts were described as ‘Curia Legalie’ and ‘View of Frankpledge’ (See 10 April 1622.)  These Court Rolls are among the Tintinhull Church records deposited at the Somerset County Record Office, Taunton.


1613.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The custom of selling seats in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, began in this year.
The first rates were made about this time, and the Churchwardens were frequently ‘excommunicated for not attending to episcopal orders’.


1613/78.    The second part of the Churchwarden’s Accounts are dated between these years.  (The earlier ones were dated from 1433/1611).


1614.    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record-
Paid for a Bible for the said Church (St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull) from one Mr. Helme in London         48.08d.
And paid him for a Communion Book at the same time         
Also paid for the carriage of the said books and a pack cloth to ‘paicke’ (pack) them in for saving of them in carriage from London to us, and for the carriage of letters from us to the said Mr. John Helme        4s.08d.
Total paid to Mr. Helme        48s.00d.
Paid for fires for Sudbury in Devon and Walden in Essex, also Southampton, Peckham     
    
(I could not find Sudbury or Walden on any map I have.)
Loss at sea by pirates at Lyme. (Lyme Regis, Co. Dorset)    
Timing bottle (? an hourglass) exchanged for a pewter pott    
(these were briefs)
For whipping dogs out of the Church (of St. Margaret’s)    
Sallet oil for the Clock    
For my state being excommunicated. (See 1613)    
2_ quarts of wine, at 16d. a quart        3s.04d.
For bere (beer) coming home (to Tintinhull) from Somerton. Had dinner at Somerton and a drop (of beer) at Ilchester on the way             (No cost for the above dinner etc. is given.  Somerton is about ten miles due north of Tintinhull, and Ilchester is about three miles due east of Tintinhull).


1615    Thomas Brown (of Tintinhull) bought the old Church Bible from the Churchwardens.  (Under the Will of Thomas Napper (4) dated 25 Aug. 1694, he left the reversion of Henry Browne’s tenement to his son Andrew Napper).

1617    The Church Bell No. 1 is inscribed:- ‘Geeve (give) thanks to God 1617.  John Napper and John Mabbard.  (Cast) by Robert Wiseman of Montacute.  (See p.26 1635 re the Silver Chalice initials).  (The oldest Bell is No.4 and is dated 1602).

1623    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
That the Churchwardens were ‘rather merry’.  (Perhaps coming back from Somerton via Ilchester.  (See 1614).
A new Pulpit and Communion Table………………………………………………….

23 Sep.1626    The third Brass Memorial on the floor of St. Margaret’s Church by the Sanctuary steps, reads ‘ Here lieth the body of Thomas Napper, eldest sonne of the said Nicholas Napper and Propriator of the said Rectory and Parsonage, was buried here the 23rd day of September A.D. 1626(Note that the Memorial Brass to Nicholas Napper and his son Thomas Napper are both on the same piece of Brass).

1629    The St. Margaret’s Church Bell No. 5 is inscribed:- I.W. A.S. 1629.  Cast by William Wiseman the son of Robert Wiseman.’
(Robert Wiseman cast bell No.1 in 1617.  The initials I.W. stand for John Wilkins; The initials A.S. stand for Adam Smythe who were both Churchwardens of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull at this period of time.
(See 1602, 1603, and 1617.  Also 1650 re the ‘tenement of John Wilkins).

1633    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
A kitchen was added to the Vicar’s house at Tintinhull.  The Vicar at that time was the Rev. Adam Farneham who died in 1646.

1635    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The South Porch of the Church of St. Margaret’s at Tintinhull was re-built.  Thomas Napper (2) collected tithes to the value of £30.16s.11d.  The King’s Arms (i.e. the Armorial Bearings of King Charles 1. who reigned from 1626/1648/9) and a sentence of Scripture were set up in the Church. (See 1648)…………………………………….

1635    The Church Chalice and Paten with this date is marked ‘R.W.’ I think these are the initials of Robert Wiseman of Montacute who cast the bells of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull in 1602 (Bell No.4) and again in 1617. (Bell No.1)  Or it may have been given to the church by his son William Wiseman in memory of his father, since it was William and not Robert who cast the Bell No.5 in 1629, possibly because his father had either retired or died in the meantime.

1645/6    About this time Oliver Cromwell and his Troops were in the neighbourhood of Tintinhull.  This was during the last years of the Rev. Adam Farneham’s life – he died in 1646.
The Cromwellian Troops smashed the windows of St. Margaret’s Church, and did what damage they could. (see1646).

1646    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The two surplices the Troopers did take them out of the Church and cut them in pieces, and the poor of the Parish had the pieces.  
Alice Brown, a Churchwarden at this date* cut up the Cope and made it into a covering for the Altar Table.**
*’..woman Churchwardens.. See p.53.
** See 1648/9 re Tablecloth made from a Cope.







1645/60    A note in the Bishop’s* Register reads: ‘Between 1645 and 1660 (during the time of the wars)** there were no persons admitted to any parish throughout the Diocese of Bath and Wells’.
*Between 1632-1670 William Pierce was the Bishop of Bath and Wells.  Translate from Peterborough 26. Nov. 1632.  He died in April 1670.
**  The Wars referred to were the Civil Wars between the Roundheads of Oliver Cromwell’s Army, and the Cavaliers of King Charles 1’s Army.

1645    The Rev. Adam Farneham, as Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, signed the Churchwarden’s Accounts for the last time.  (He died in 1646).

1646    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
For striking out the King’s Arms…………………(This entry refers to the Armorial Bearings of King Charles 1. who was beheaded by order of Oliver Cromwell on the 30th Jan. 1648/9. See 1624 when the Arms were erected in the Church).
Inventory of Goods. (Vestry)
3 surplices. (Presumably these were replacements for those torn up by Cromwell’s Troopers in 1645/6).
1 table cloth made of a Cope. (See 1645/6 re Alice Brown).
1 cushion for the Pulpit.
1 table cloth (linen) (‘The Table’ must mean the Altar Table).
2 towels. (linen).
1 apron of linen to put about the Communion Cup.
1 pewter standing pot.
1 Spit with two rackets.  (This was used to strain or draw off from the lees, or sediment of wine).
1 Racket for the Clerk.  (The Rev. John Pym was the Curate in 1651).

5 Jun. 1650    Thomas Napper (2) died and was buried at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  The brass Memorial Tablet on the floor of the Church, and 4th from the Sanctuary steps, reads: HIC JACIT CORPUS THOMAE MAPPER – GENERUSI HVIVS RECTORIAE PROPRIETARIJ QUI SEPULTUS ERAT VICESIMO QUINTO DIE 1V111J A.D. 1650’.  Which is translated:- Here lies the body of Thomas Napper gentleman (who) was proprietor of the Rectory who died 5th day June A.D. 1650.

1651    The Rev. John Pym, Curate, was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Thomas Napper (3) may have been his Patron, though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.  (Thomas Napper (3) born in 1636.  Died 15 June 1700).

1657    The Rev. Robert Hunt was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Thomas Napper (3) may have been his Patron, though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1660    The Rev. Jno. Large was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1661    The Rev. Thos. Farnham* was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.  
*Note that on the 13th Sept. 1609 the Rev. Adam Farneham was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Possibly the father or grandfather of the Rev. Thomas Farnham.

1662    The Rev. John Hopkins was Curate Pro Tem. Of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1662/1673    The ‘Easter Book’ started by Thomas Napper (3) who died 15 June 1700, records ‘donations and tithes due yearly at Easter’.  (Ref. Somerset Country Record Office DD/X/HO).


1667    The Rev. Nathaniel Boughton, Curate, was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1668    The reputed value of the Benefice of Tintinhull was £30 per annum at this date.

1669    Thomas Napper (3) purchased the Manor of Tintinhull, which had not been acquired with the impropriation a century earlier.  In 1559 Nicholas Napper, the great grandfather of Thomas Napper (3) purchased the impropriation of the Rectory and the Lease of the Estate for the sum of £237.
The title, both to the Manor and also to the tithes and advowson coalesced (came together) for in 1669 the Manor was purchased by Thomas Napper (3) so that the title to the tithes and advowson passed in direct male line for seven generations of Nappers, and existed over 232 years in this same family.

1670    The Churchwardens Accounts record:-
Payments for the redemption of Captives in Turkey…………………………………

1672    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Two seamen wounded in the last engagement at sea…… (Presumably they had come from the village of Tintinhull.  I do not know to what ‘battle-at-sea’ this entry refers).
(written in pencil on side: 3rd Anglo Dutch War 1672-4.  1672 Battle of Sole Bay off the Essex Coast).

1678    The Churchwarden’s Accounts end in this year. They began in 1432/3.

1685    The ‘Easter Book’ kept by Thomas Napper (3) and after his death in June 1700 by his grandson Thomas Napper (5).
In 1685 Thomas Napper (3) notes: ‘Mrs. Naper’s new house’.  (This house became known as ‘The Dower House’ since it was lived in by three widows of Napper men, the widows being Honor the widow of Thomas Napper (2) and Rebecca the widow of Thomas Napper (4) and then by Elizabeth who outlived her husband Thomas Napper (5) by two years only.

28 Oct.1690    The Rev. Robert Pittard Rector of Thorne Coffin and Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Registers do not record any name as being a Patron.
At this time the Parsonage estate consisted of tithes and small scattered pieces of Glebe land, including presumably, a close of pasture to the West of the Church, still known in the year 1839 as ‘Parson’s Close’.  (I do not know if the name still remains in 1988).

27 Aug.1694    A Memorial inscription in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, reads:- ‘Near this spot lie the body of Thomas Napper, Gentleman, grandson of Thomas Napper, second son of Thomas Napper, successively owners of the impropriation’.  (Here follows some Latin words which were not sufficiently clear for me to read).  Obit 27 die Aug. A.D. 1694 aged 33’.

4 Aug.1712    A Memorial Stone on the floor of the South Porch of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, reads: ‘Here lies the body of Arthur Hody, Gentleman who departed this life the 4 August in the year of our Lord 1712 and of his age 39 years.  (He) married Mary the only daughter of the Rev. Mr. Perry of West Coker by whom he had 3 children. The eldest is interred under this stone in the same grave with him. Mary the youngest daughter only…’  (I could not read any further as the rain was coming down too heavily, and the light was almost gone).

1721    The ‘Cross Tree’ was planted on the Tintinhull Village Green’ to celebrate a victory’.  I do not know to what victory this refers.  (The ‘Cross Tree’ died in 1973 due to the Dutch Elm Disease and was cut down in 1974 at the age of 252 years.(Its roots were removed in June 1989 and a Park Seat is to be erected where one the Cross Tree stood).





1 July 1721 .
A Memorial Tablet in St. Margaret’s Church Tintinhull, reads: ‘Martha daughter of Solomon Andrews of Lyme Regis Esq., relict of Henry Manton of Harwood in Calstone* died 1 July 1721 aged 56.  Erected by John Fursman, Chancellor of Exeter**.  Sculptured by Louis Francis Roubiliac. (1695/1762).
*Calstone in probably Calstone Wellington, south and east of Calne, Co. Wilts.
** John Fursman.  1717 Lancelot Blackburn was dean of Exeter. Elected 30 Jan 1716/17.  Translated to York 1724.  I could not find any reference to John Fursman.
Martha was a sister of Rebecca Andrews who married Thomas Napper (4).


1721    New stocks were erected to replace the old ones erected in 1350.  (see 1933).

1722    The Churchwarden’s of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, arranged for the Churchwarden’s Accounts and other Church documents to be bound at a cost of 4 shillings.  As Thomas Napper (4) was one of the Churchwardens, it was agreed that the books should be kept at The Parsonage/The Mansion – I do not know which as the Napper family owned both houses.  (See Feb. 1883).

1722    The Church Overseers were renting 5 houses known as ‘Poor Houses’.

1724    Andrew Napper (1) youngest son of Thomas Napper (4) married Elizabeth Lockett, possibly the daughter or relative of the Rev. Henry Lockett who was appointed rector of Thorn Coffin by Thomas Napper (5).

1729    The Living at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was augmented by the impropriator* and in 1761** it was augmented again.
*The impropriator at this date was Thomas Napper (5) who died 24 Nov. 1737.
**The impropriator at this date was John Napper (1) who inherited The Parsonage from his elder brother Thomas Napper (6) on the latter’s death on 10. Jan 1760. (See 1761 and 1819).

23 Sep.1730    The Rev. Henry Lockett was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (5) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.


    *5 Aug. 1998
Above the Porch leading into St. Margaret’s Church is a slab of stone.  As far as we could read it:-
IV ANNO THEODOR
*THOMAS HO
NS O< SET.V
OE. MARCH (1634 or 1654).

*Could this be Thomas Napper or Thomas Brown who bought the old Bible (Checked by Robert Hughes and Ann Hughes July 1998).

1615    Thomas Brown (of Tintinhull) bought the old Church Bible from the Churchwardens.  (Under the Will of Thomas Napper (4) dated 25 Aug. 1694, he left the reversion of Henry Browne’s tenement to his son Andrew Napper).

1617    The Church Bell No. 1 is inscribed:- ‘Geeve (give) thanks to God 1617.  John Napper and John Mabbard.  (Cast) by Robert Wiseman of Montacute.  (See p.26 1635 re the Silver Chalice initials).  (The oldest Bell is No.4 and is dated 1602).

1623    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
That the Churchwardens were ‘rather merry’.  (Perhaps coming back from Somerton via Ilchester.  (See 1614).
A new Pulpit and Communion Table………………………………………………….

23 Sep.1626    The third Brass Memorial on the floor of St. Margaret’s Church by the Sanctuary steps, reads ‘ Here lieth the body of Thomas Napper, eldest sonne of the said Nicholas Napper and Propriator of the said Rectory and Parsonage, was buried here the 23rd day of September A.D. 1626(Note that the Memorial Brass to Nicholas Napper and his son Thomas Napper are both on the same piece of Brass).

1629    The St. Margaret’s Church Bell No. 5 is inscribed:- I.W. A.S. 1629.  Cast by William Wiseman the son of Robert Wiseman.’
(Robert Wiseman cast bell No.1 in 1617.  The initials I.W. stand for John Wilkins; The initials A.S. stand for Adam Smythe who were both Churchwardens of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull at this period of time.
(See 1602, 1603, and 1617.  Also 1650 re the ‘tenement of John Wilkins).

1633    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
A kitchen was added to the Vicar’s house at Tintinhull.  The Vicar at that time was the Rev. Adam Farneham who died in 1646.

1635    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The South Porch of the Church of St. Margaret’s at Tintinhull was re-built.  Thomas Napper (2) collected tithes to the value of £30.16s.11d.  The King’s Arms (i.e. the Armorial Bearings of King Charles 1. who reigned from 1626/1648/9) and a sentence of Scripture were set up in the Church. (See 1648)…………………………………….

1635    The Church Chalice and Paten with this date is marked ‘R.W.’ I think these are the initials of Robert Wiseman of Montacute who cast the bells of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull in 1602 (Bell No.4) and again in 1617. (Bell No.1)  Or it may have been given to the church by his son William Wiseman in memory of his father, since it was William and not Robert who cast the Bell No.5 in 1629, possibly because his father had either retired or died in the meantime.

1645/6    About this time Oliver Cromwell and his Troops were in the neighbourhood of Tintinhull.  This was during the last years of the Rev. Adam Farneham’s life – he died in 1646.
The Cromwellian Troops smashed the windows of St. Margaret’s Church, and did what damage they could. (see1646).

1646    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
The two surplices the Troopers did take them out of the Church and cut them in pieces, and the poor of the Parish had the pieces.  
Alice Brown, a Churchwarden at this date* cut up the Cope and made it into a covering for the Altar Table.**
*’..woman Churchwardens.. See p.53.
** See 1648/9 re Tablecloth made from a Cope.




1645/60    A note in the Bishop’s* Register reads: ‘Between 1645 and 1660 (during the time of the wars)** there were no persons admitted to any parish throughout the Diocese of Bath and Wells’.
*Between 1632-1670 William Pierce was the Bishop of Bath and Wells.  Translate from Peterborough 26. Nov. 1632.  He died in April 1670.
**  The Wars referred to were the Civil Wars between the Roundheads of Oliver Cromwell’s Army, and the Cavaliers of King Charles 1’s Army.

1645    The Rev. Adam Farneham, as Vicar of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, signed the Churchwarden’s Accounts for the last time.  (He died in 1646).

1646    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
For striking out the King’s Arms…………………(This entry refers to the Armorial Bearings of King Charles 1. who was beheaded by order of Oliver Cromwell on the 30th Jan. 1648/9. See 1624 when the Arms were erected in the Church).
Inventory of Goods. (Vestry)
3 surplices. (Presumably these were replacements for those torn up by Cromwell’s Troopers in 1645/6).
1 table cloth made of a Cope. (See 1645/6 re Alice Brown).
1 cushion for the Pulpit.
1 table cloth (linen) (‘The Table’ must mean the Altar Table).
2 towels. (linen).
1 apron of linen to put about the Communion Cup.
1 pewter standing pot.
1 Spit with two rackets.  (This was used to strain or draw off from the lees, or sediment of wine).
1 Racket for the Clerk.  (The Rev. John Pym was the Curate in 1651).

5 Jun. 1650    Thomas Napper (2) died and was buried at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  The brass Memorial Tablet on the floor of the Church, and 4th from the Sanctuary steps, reads: HIC JACIT CORPUS THOMAE MAPPER – GENERUSI HVIVS RECTORIAE PROPRIETARIJ QUI SEPULTUS ERAT VICESIMO QUINTO DIE 1V111J A.D. 1650’.  Which is translated:- Here lies the body of Thomas Napper gentleman (who) was proprietor of the Rectory who died 5th day June A.D. 1650.

1651    The Rev. John Pym, Curate, was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Thomas Napper (3) may have been his Patron, though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.  (Thomas Napper (3) born in 1636.  Died 15 June 1700).

1657    The Rev. Robert Hunt was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Thomas Napper (3) may have been his Patron, though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1660    The Rev. Jno. Large was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1661    The Rev. Thos. Farnham* was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.  
*Note that on the 13th Sept. 1609 the Rev. Adam Farneham was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  Possibly the father or grandfather of the Rev. Thomas Farnham.

1662    The Rev. John Hopkins was Curate Pro Tem. Of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1662/1673    The ‘Easter Book’ started by Thomas Napper (3) who died 15 June 1700, records ‘donations and tithes due yearly at Easter’.  (Ref. Somerset Country Record Office DD/X/HO).


1667    The Rev. Nathaniel Boughton, Curate, was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

1668    The reputed value of the Benefice of Tintinhull was £30 per annum at this date.

1669    Thomas Napper (3) purchased the Manor of Tintinhull, which had not been acquired with the impropriation a century earlier.  In 1559 Nicholas Napper, the great grandfather of Thomas Napper (3) purchased the impropriation of the Rectory and the Lease of the Estate for the sum of £237.
The title, both to the Manor and also to the tithes and advowson coalesced (came together) for in 1669 the Manor was purchased by Thomas Napper (3) so that the title to the tithes and advowson passed in direct male line for seven generations of Nappers, and existed over 232 years in this same family.

1670    The Churchwardens Accounts record:-
Payments for the redemption of Captives in Turkey…………………………………

1672    The Churchwarden’s Accounts record:-
Two seamen wounded in the last engagement at sea…… (Presumably they had come from the village of Tintinhull.  I do not know to what ‘battle-at-sea’ this entry refers).
(written in pencil on side: 3rd Anglo Dutch War 1672-4.  1672 Battle of Sole Bay off the Essex Coast).

1678    The Churchwarden’s Accounts end in this year. They began in 1432/3.

1685    The ‘Easter Book’ kept by Thomas Napper (3) and after his death in June 1700 by his grandson Thomas Napper (5).
In 1685 Thomas Napper (3) notes: ‘Mrs. Naper’s new house’.  (This house became known as ‘The Dower House’ since it was lived in by three widows of Napper men, the widows being Honor the widow of Thomas Napper (2) and Rebecca the widow of Thomas Napper (4) and then by Elizabeth who outlived her husband Thomas Napper (5) by two years only.

28 Oct.1690    The Rev. Robert Pittard Rector of Thorne Coffin and Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (3) though the Registers do not record any name as being a Patron.
At this time the Parsonage estate consisted of tithes and small scattered pieces of Glebe land, including presumably, a close of pasture to the West of the Church, still known in the year 1839 as ‘Parson’s Close’.  (I do not know if the name still remains in 1988).

27 Aug.1694    A Memorial inscription in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, reads:- ‘Near this spot lie the body of Thomas Napper, Gentleman, grandson of Thomas Napper, second son of Thomas Napper, successively owners of the impropriation’.  (Here follows some Latin words which were not sufficiently clear for me to read).  Obit 27 die Aug. A.D. 1694 aged 33’.

4 Aug.1712    A Memorial Stone on the floor of the South Porch of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, reads: ‘Here lies the body of Arthur Hody, Gentleman who departed this life the 4 August in the year of our Lord 1712 and of his age 39 years.  (He) married Mary the only daughter of the Rev. Mr. Perry of West Coker by whom he had 3 children. The eldest is interred under this stone in the same grave with him. Mary the youngest daughter only…’  (I could not read any further as the rain was coming down too heavily, and the light was almost gone).

1721    The ‘Cross Tree’ was planted on the Tintinhull Village Green’ to celebrate a victory’.  I do not know to what victory this refers.  (The ‘Cross Tree’ died in 1973 due to the Dutch Elm Disease and was cut down in 1974 at the age of 252 years.(Its roots were removed in June 1989 and a Park Seat is to be erected where one the Cross Tree stood).





1 July 1721   
A Memorial Tablet in St. Margaret’s Church Tintinhull, reads: ‘Martha daughter of Solomon Andrews of Lyme Regis Esq., relict of Henry Manton of Harwood in Calstone* died 1 July 1721 aged 56.  Erected by John Fursman, Chancellor of Exeter**.  Sculptured by Louis Francis Roubiliac. (1695/1762).
*Calstone in probably Calstone Wellington, south and east of Calne, Co. Wilts.
** John Fursman.  1717 Lancelot Blackburn was dean of Exeter. Elected 30 Jan 1716/17.  Translated to York 1724.  I could not find any reference to John Fursman.
Martha was a sister of Rebecca Andrews who married Thomas Napper (4).


1721    New stocks were erected to replace the old ones erected in 1350.  (see 1933).

1722    The Churchwarden’s of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, arranged for the Churchwarden’s Accounts and other Church documents to be bound at a cost of 4 shillings.  As Thomas Napper (4) was one of the Churchwardens, it was agreed that the books should be kept at The Parsonage/The Mansion – I do not know which as the Napper family owned both houses.  (See Feb. 1883).

1722    The Church Overseers were renting 5 houses known as ‘Poor Houses’.

1724    Andrew Napper (1) youngest son of Thomas Napper (4) married Elizabeth Lockett, possibly the daughter or relative of the Rev. Henry Lockett who was appointed rector of Thorn Coffin by Thomas Napper (5).

1729    The Living at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was augmented by the impropriator* and in 1761** it was augmented again.
*The impropriator at this date was Thomas Napper (5) who died 24 Nov. 1737.
**The impropriator at this date was John Napper (1) who inherited The Parsonage from his elder brother Thomas Napper (6) on the latter’s death on 10. Jan 1760. (See 1761 and 1819).

23 Sep.1730    The Rev. Henry Lockett was the Incumbent of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron may have been Thomas Napper (5) though the Register does not record the name of any Patron.

    *5 Aug. 1998
Above the Porch leading into St. Margaret’s Church is a slab of stone.  As far as we could read it:-
IV ANNO THEODOR
*THOMAS HO
NS O< SET.V
OE. MARCH (1634 or 1654).

*Could this be Thomas Napper or Thomas Brown who bought the old Bible (Checked by Robert Hughes and Ann Hughes July 1998).


    TITHES (Contd.)
    Tithe books of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries have been preserved in a few parishes, as also have miscellaneous papers referring to tithes.  These may be in Church Vestries or at the County Record Office.
The records of Ecclesiastical Courts have some references to the enforcements of tithe payments.  The Exchequer Court of Pleas, and other Lay Courts, also have cases of disputes between Clergy and laity about tithes.

1839.    The Parsonage Estate consisted of tithes and small scattered pieces of Glebe land in 1681, including presumably a Close of Pasture to the west of the Church of St. Margaret’s, Tintinhull, which was still (1839) known as ‘Parson’s Close’.  (I wonder if it has retained this name today in 1988?)

1839.    The Parish of Tintinhull became part of the Yeovil Poor Law Union and the Tintinhull Poor Houses were sold.  (See 1722. 1762. and 1777.)

1840.    The Vicarage at Tintinhull was ‘let as a cottage’.

1842.    The last election of a ‘Tithingman’ took place in this year.
These were a group of men and boys, originally ten in number, who were held responsible to the Manor court for its members’ good conduct.  Each male of the age of 12 and over was obliged to be in a tithing.  The Tithing List of the manor was checked at each View of Frankpledge, and all boys who had reached the eligible age were enrolled.  The elected representative of the tithing was the Tithingman.  He was responsible for presenting to the Manor Court all misdemeanors committed by members of families within his tithing.  (Later the term came to mean a sub-division of a parish.)

 

13 July 1843.    A Memorial Tablet at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull records:- ‘To betty Clark, wife of John Clark of Perrins Hill in this Parish, who died 13th July 1843 aged 78 years.  (See 10 Nov. 1849 & 1. Nov. 1856.)



18 July 1844.    A Memorial Tablet in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, records:-
‘To the Memory of the Rev. John Valentine B.A., for 27 years Rector of this Parish, who died 18 July 1844.  (See 30 March 1854 & 25 Nov. 1857.)



9 Nov. 1845.    The Rec. Alex Ramsay was the Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott. (See 21 Dec. 1811.)



14 Sept. 1848.    A Memorial Tablet at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull records:-
‘Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Macfarlane of Tain, in the south of Scotland, who died 14 Sept. 1848 aged 44 years. Erected by his widow Josephine Loking.  (I think the surname is Loking, but it was difficult to read.)



 

10 Nov. 1849.    A Memorial Tablet at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, records:- ‘….. and to John son of the above named John and Betty Clarke of Perrins Hill, Tintinhull, who died 10 Nov. 1849 aged 56 years.’  (See 1st. Nov. 1856 and 13 July 1843.)



22 May 1851.    The Rev. William Allford was the Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott  (See 21. Dec. 1811.)



13 Nov. 1853.    The Rev. S.B.Plummer was the Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott.  (See 21. Dec. 1811.)  There is a Memorial Tablet in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull to the Rev. Seth Burge Plummer, but it was too faded, and too high to be read without a strong light.)



30 March 1854.    A Memorial Tablet in St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull ‘….. also of Edmund the son of the above John Valentine, who died 30 March 1854 aged 11 (?) years.’



3 Jan. 1855.    The Rev. George Henry Newman was the Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott.  (See 21 Dec. 1811. – the Arbuthnott’s firm of solicitors dealing with their Tintinhull Estate was Newman, Paynter, Gould and Newman of Yeovil.)



14 Dec. 1855.    The Rev. William M. Smith was the Curate of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  His Patron was the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott.  (See 21 Dec. 1811.)



1 Nov. 1856.    A Memorial Tablet at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, records:- ‘….also the above name John Clark of Perrinshill in this parish, who died 1st. Nov. 1856 aged 92.’  (See 13 July 1843 and 10 Nov. 1849.)



25 Nov. 1857.    A Memorial Tablet at St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, records:- ‘….also Sarah relict of the above Rev. John Valentine who died 25 Nov. 1857 aged 51 years.’  (See July 1843 and 30 March 1854.)



1862.    Major William Wilson, of The Limes, Tintinhull, by his Will dated in 1862, left:- ‘ A Rent-Charge of £5 payable yearly on 24th Dec. for a dinner of roast beef and plum pudding on Christmas Day to the ‘deserving pupils’ of the (Tintinhull) Sunday School.’  It was still being administered one hundred years later for the benefit of children connected with St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.

Mrs Russ nee Brown, who lived to be 103 recalled the ‘Christmas Dinner’ in the Big Hall of The limes in the time of Mr William Wilson, which must have been before 1862 when he died.  Mrs Russ died 20 May 1946 aged 103, and so would have been aged 20 in 1862 when Major Wilson died.





26 Aug. 1862.    A local newspaper recorded that ‘A great gloom has been thrown over the parish of Tintinhull by the death of William Wilson Esq., who died in the 95th year of his age.  He had resided in the same house in which he died for 66 years. (i.e. from 1796 onwards)  His Major’s Commission is dated 10 Jan. 1807.  He transferred into the East Somerset Regiment of Local Militia and his Commission is dated 24 Sept. 1808.  He will be buried at Tintinhull.’



1871.    A new Vicarage was built in the village of Tintinhull.  (See 1968.)



1 Sept. 1871.    The Rev. J.B.Hyson was the Rector of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull.  The Hon. William Arbuthnott was his Patron.  (His elder brother the Hon. Hugh Arbuthnott having died unmarried 11 July 1868 and the Tintinhull Court Estate passed to his next eldest brother.)



Nov. 1882.    Work on the Restoration of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, was begun.  The plans were prepared by Mr. A.W. Hansell, and architect from London, whose designs wisely provided that none of the interesting features of the original building should be destroyed.  Mr. Hansell bore testimony to the faithful way in which the Contractor, Messrs. Fredk. Fane and Son of Stoke-Sub-Hamdon, carried out the work,  (The Church was re-opened by Lord A.C, Hervey, 28 Nov. 1883.)



1st Feb. 1883.    Mr. Sam B. Penny was one of the Churchwardens of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull at this date.
Up to this time the old Churchwarden’s Accounts had been kept by Mr. Sam B. Penny of Tintinhull House, Tintinhull.
 


1st. Feb. 1883.    The Rev. J.B. Hyson asked Bishop Hobhouse, an eminent Ecclesiastical archaeological scholar to examine the old Churchwarden’s Accounts which dated from 1433/4 – 1650.  

The Rt. Rev. Bishop Edmund Hobhouse, D.D. Oxon., was the son of the Rt. Hon. Henry Hobhouse, Under-Secretary of State at the Home Dept. who died in 1854.
Bishop Edmund Hobhouse was born in 1817 and married first the daughter of Lt. General the Hon. J. Brodrick.  He married secondly the daughter of the Rev. D. Williams, D.C.L. Warden of New College, Oxford.
Bishop Hobhouse was Vicar of St. Peter’s Oxford, 1843/58.  Bishop of Nelson* 1858/64.  Chancellor of Lichfield 1874/5.  Assistant Bishop of Lichfield 1869/80, at which date he lived at Wells, Somerset.
*The Atlas gives nineteen places called ‘Nelson’ round the world, of which two are in Great Britain, namely one in Glamorgan, Wales, and the other in Lancashire, England.

Bishop Edmund Hobhouse gave a Lecture on Friday afternoon, the 1st of February 1883 in the village Schoolhouse at Tintinhull, to a large and attentive audience, under the heading :- ‘The ancient Church and Parish Books of Tintinhull’.  He was applauded on rising.

He said that ‘A number of ancient and most interesting documents relating to the Ecclesiastical affairs of Tintinhull had recently come to light.  (C. 1883)  They had been in the possession of the family of Mr. Sam B. Penny, but as they were illegible to all except scholars who understood Church Latin of the 15th or 16th centuries, their real character was never suspected until recently.

    1st. February 1883 (Contd.)

In the year 1772 Thomas Napper, then one of the Churchwardens of St. Margaret’s Church, Tintinhull, had these records neatly bound at a cost of 4 shillings, and left them, with numerous other interesting documents, books, Court Rolls etc, in the house now (Feb. 1883) in the possession of Mr. Sam B. Penny, whose father purchased the house* of the said Thomas Napper’s descendants.
*This is Tintinhull House, not Tintinhull Court, but both belonged to the Napper Family in 1722.  It was sold by the Nappers of East Pennard to the Penny family.

Beginning about the year 1433 (Henry VI 1429/61) the records give something like a continuous history of the Ecclesiastical affairs of the parish of Tintinhull for some two centuries, with a brief but important gap for the period comprising the short reign of Edward VI (1546/53) and Queen Mary (1553/58) when the records were either lost or not recorded.

The Vicar of Tintinhull, the Rev. J.B. Tyson, with a laudable desire to make public property of all of that was interesting in these documents, submitted them to him for examination, when it was found that the papers, or rather parchments, threw much light on the public life of the parish four or five centuries ago, he had been asked to put the results of his investigation into the form of a Lecture.  This he had done.

He said that they had all been sufficiently informed of his reason for coming to Tintinhull that afternoon.  They knew there was in the possession of their Parish a most unusual inheritance, namely, Churchwarden’s Accounts running back into the 15th century.  He knew of no other rural parish possessing such an inheritance.

There were, however, in some town parishes, documents as old, or older than these.  For example, in the parish of St. Michael, Bath, there was a complete arrangement of documents running back to the 14th century.  They had been published by the Somerset Archaeological Society.
They were all worth examining, and threw much light on many of the manuscripts of Tintinhull.

The documents of the Parish of Tintinhull dated from the early part of the reign of Henry VI (1429/61).  The earliest was dated in 1433.  He had gone through them all cursorily, and hastily with the eye.  A large number he had examined closely, and could almost venture to certify that there was nothing more of interest to be found in them than he had extracted.  Others he had only passed his eye over, and might possibly have omitted interesting facts which future examiners would catch up.

He said that he would first speak of the condition of the Parish before the commencement of these records, and he hoped a few words on that point would enable them to understand better than they otherwise might, the subject on which he was addressing them.

The Manor, Advowson – the right of presentation to a Benefice – and Hundred of Tintinhull were given at some early date – probably very soon after the Conquest of 1066, by the Conqueror to the Earl of Mortaine, who was the Founder of the Castle of Montacute, and by him or his immediate successor – they were given to Montacute Priory.
The Priory was the owner of the land, and presented a Rector to the Bishop for Institution.  In 1529 the Prior became the permanent Rector, and had to appoint a Vicar.
 
    1st Feb. 1883 (Contd.)
In 1537, when a valuation was made by Henry VIII, for the purpose of raising taxes, the Rectory was valued at £18 nett, and the Vicarage at £10.  He could remind them that these Accounts related only to the Ecclesiastical life of the Parish.  They were not records of its Civil Life, which would be found in the Manor Court Rolls, if they existed but these records doubtless went into the possession of Montacute Priory, and possibly disappeared at the time of its dissolution on the 20th March 1539.

The Ecclesiastical Constitution of a parish was far more distinct from the Civil constitution in the 15th century, than it was in the 18th and into the 19th centuries, until the recent (1883?) changes took place. (i.e. the Manor Courts ceased to be held in Tintinhull).
Though the persons composing the Ecclesiastical, and the persons composing the Civil parish, were precisely the same, yet they acted in their different capacities under different officers.

The centre of the Civil Parish was the Manor House, and the Manor Court held in that house, and to that centre men of the manor (sometimes co-existensive with the Parish) sometimes not, were summonable by the Lord of the Manor.
There they met under the Lord’s bailiff, and could present any nuisance that affected the tenants of the Manor.  The Jury of Tenants could adjudge fines on any offence against the un-written laws of the Manor.
They appointed such Officers as Haywards (see 1842) – who had power over the Parish Pound – and conners of ale and bread.  But alongside that which concerned the Civil Life of the parish was the Ecclesiastical life of the community.

When these same persons met for Ecclesiastical purposes, they entirely forgot the name of the ‘Manor’ and did not meet in the Manor House.  They met in the Church, made the Parish Priest the natural Chairman and President, and elected two representative laymen as Wardens of the Church and Church goods.

In some town parishes, where they sometimes had a room for Meetings, they acquired the name of ‘Vestry’ in any of the documents of that parish.
The word ‘Vestry’ appeared to have originated in some town parishes.

The parishioners of Tintinhull met, it did not appear where, but no doubt in the Church of St. Margaret’s, for Ecclesiastical business, and the Ecclesiastical parish, when thus convened, had certain powers, in virtue of prescriptive rights – probably the ‘community-right’ of managing local affairs by majorities – of taxing themselves for their common needs.
But they used the power very sparingly, for he could not find in that parish any early records of any Church rates, which had not been made by any Statute, but only when Civil charges were thrown on the Parish.  They then began to use their own power of rating themselves.

The parishioners in Vestry were not a Court like the parishioners in Manor Courts were.  They could not impose penalties or fines, or make presentments of nuisances as in the Manor Court, but they were under the Bishop’s Court, and they could present defaulters to that Court.

An offence against that order of the Vestry was presentable and punishable in the Bishop’s Court.  He did not know of any Vestry proceedings being extant.  If there were such, they would have as good a picture of the workings of the Ecclesiastical Parish, in its assembled form, as they had of the Civil work in the Manor Court Rolls.

1st Feb 1883
(cont'd)



    Bishop Hobhouse continued by saying that it was quite evident that the documents with which he was dealing were produced in Vestry, and were regularly written by persons specially employed for the purpose, for in those days there were very few 'CLERKLY' hands, and reading and writing were distinct professions.

The Accounts were always written out by hired clerks, and audited.  Thus the Church goods were transferred from the outgoing Churchwardens to the new Churchwardens, who were elected by the parishioners.

Other acts were also done by the parishioners in what is now known as 'Vestry'.  There was no doubt that the parishioners had the power of rating themselves; but they did not do that until after the failure of voluntary means.

Early in King James I's reign (1603/25) they began regularly to levy rates.  The amount of these rates and the acreage were regularly written in the Accounts, so that they had a nominal roll of all the parishioners.

Now, as to the Officers of the parish.  Of course, there was a Rector.  In 1529 (King Henry VIII, 1509/46) when the Rectory became appropriated to the Priory of Montacute, a Vicar was substituted for a Rector.  The Churchwardens were chosen by the people, but that did not mean that the senior warden might not have been nominated by the Vicar, as at present (1883), but if it was the custom for the Vicar to nominate his warden, that appointment was ratified by his parishioners.  The mode of electing the wardens was not stated.  The election was always annual, though the length of the term of office sometimes varied.  First the term was from Easter to Easter, then from Easter to St. Mary Magdalene's Day (1439), then from St. Mary Magdalene's Day to St. Michael's Day (1465), then from St. Michael's Day to Saints Simon and Jude, then from Palm Sunday to Palm Sunday.

The earliest title of the Wardens was 'Wardens of the Goods of the Church'.  The Wardens' duty was to look after the fabric of the Church - to see that it was kept in proper repair.  Their Titles varied.  They were called 'custodes honorum eccleasist guerdiant' and 'procuratores'.

There were also female wardens*, who, as far as could be gathered, performed the functions of the office.  The Wardens were always present at Visitation to the received authority, to make presentations, and to receive monitions.  They had no assistants.

* Female Churchwardens.  See 1645/6 re. Alice Brown.

Bishop Hobhouse did not find any mention of any Sidesmen.  He only found that now and then they took other parishioners to the Visitation - he presumed when presentments were made, to support them in their allegations.

The name of 'Sidesmen' was given, possibly, to those who supported the Wardens in any allegations they made in their presentments - it was a short word for 'synodsmen' - 'taken to act as witnesses.'

The Wardens employed regular accountants - men who were very learned, and kept accounts in a very clear and systematic manner.  The Accountants were always hired officers, very often, no doubt, the clergyman of the parish, or a neighbouring clergyman.  There was also an Auditor.  Seeing that the Accounts were all in Latin it was necessary for the parishioners to have a skilled Auditor.

Then there were minor officers, such as the clerk 'agua bajulus' water carriers, from the fact that he carried vessels containing the Holy Water to sprinkle on the heads of the congregation; the Incense-bearer, and banner-bearer.

One of the most consistent servants of the parish was the Parish Clock, which was always doing its duties.

Bishop Hobhouse came next to the charges which were to be provided for by the Wardens.  First of all were the repairs of the Clock - not the Chancel, because that was the Rector's charge; but other parts were under the charge of the Churchwardens, who repaired them at their expense.

Then the cost of the repair of the Churchyard fell on the Wardens.  The Churchyard was always called 'cinititium' - that was 'Cemetary'.  That was the name given to all ancient Churchyards; but the word had now come to mean, not a Churchyard, but a burial-ground away from the Church.

Another constant entry in the Accounts was expenses of Visitations, which were not small items.  Bishop Hobhouse explained that the Parish books of parchment and other assessories of the Church were made on the spot, the Churchwardens finding the material and employing workmen from towns, who were provided with meat, drink and lodging until their work was done.

Other considerable items in the Accounts were 'Vestments' which were, no doubt, richly adorned; and wax-lights used to a large extent for ritual purposes, some being always kept burning, whilst others were burnt at particular Festivals.

A collection was always made at Easter* amongst the parishioners for the'Pascal Taper' which was always made on the spot; the wax being bought and the taper made.  Another constant item of expense was the 'obit' or benefactor's anniversary.  Once in every year a service called 'benefactor's anniversary' was held.  A book was kept containing the names of those who had been benefactors of the Church, and there appeared to be a great desire amongst the parishioners to get their names inscribed in the 'Book of Benefactors'.  His Lordship said he saw one entry in one of these books in which a person (he believed the name was Brown) 'covenanted to maintain one of the lights for the rest of her life provided she should have her name inscribed in the 'Book of Benefactors'.

* See Thomas Napper's Easter Book - 1685.

Then there were the repairs of the fixed property, which was the cause of frequent entries, and the renewal of livestock; which were accounted amongst the 'goods of the Church'.

Then they came to the means for maintaining these charges.  In old documents they were met entirely by bequests - seldom in money, but almost always in kind - and all sorts of things were bequeathed; in fact no one, he supposed, died without leaving something to the Church:- rings, jewels, gowns, brass pots, etc. etc.

It was the universal feeling that there should be a principal bequest given to some object connected with the Church, and it was by means of these bequests that the Churchwardens secured the funds they needed.  They rejected nothing; they received everything; and part of their duty consisted in turning the goods so left into money.

At the end of each Churchwarden's year, a careful inventory of the stock, etc. was made.  They found such entries as cows, now and then a bull, sheep, hive of bees.  All these things were mentioned in the Churchwarden's Accounts and they - the Churchwardens - had to make the best they could of them.  Then, as they proceeded, they found another and more profitable means, resorted to for making money for the support of the Church - that was, having a Church-House in which were the necessary appliances for brewing and baking.

The Church House was a curious institution; but Bishop Hobhouse would speak more at length on this subject later in his lecture.

Bishop Hobhouse said that the Churchwardens had some property on the moor - to what extent he could not make out.  This property was sometimes let; sometimes crops were grown on it; and various expressions concerning it were rather puzzling.  At any rate there was an allotment on the moor - whatever that was - the proceeds from which were devoted to the Church.

The parish was finally deprived of this allotment in the 17th century, at the time of the Rebellion (the Civil war between Charles I and Oliver Cromwell).  He found in one account that the corn crop on the moor was given for the use of the Church 'by consent of the Lord and tenants of the Manor'.  That must have been given in a Civil capacity; the crop was given as it stood to the Churchwardens and it was harvested for the benefit of the Church.

Bishop Hobhouse now came to the Church House, which appeared to have been a small building, held by the Prior of Montacute, as Lord of the Manor, and to whom a 'Quit/Rent' was paid.  There was an oven in  this house, and that was employed, he supposed, for baking (as it was required) the wafer for the Holy Communion and the Holy Loaf.

It was, he believed, a universal custom throughout England for the Church to bake bread at a certain period, and for the Priest to sell it for the benefit of the Church.

Sometime afterwards, a brewing apparatus was added for brewing ale, which  was known as 'Holy Ale'.  This was sold for the benefit of the Church.  No doubt this Church House was used for the purposes he had indicated.

In the reigh of King Henry VII (1485/1509) the building was enlarged bit by bit; and he found that in 1533 (Henry VIII, 1509/46) it had reached its full extent as a Brewing House and Bake-House.

Lodgings were to be had at this house, which was also used for Festivals, to which the parishioners of Stoke-sub-Hamdon and Montacute were sometimes invited, and they, in turn, entertained the parishioners of Tintinhull in a similar manner.  So that there was a general system of entertaining people at what were called the 'Church Ales'.  His Lordship read extracts from the old records showing the profits realised on festive occasions by means of the 'Church Ales' - the amount in one case being £4 - and said it also appeared that the baking and brewing tackle was frequently used by parishioners for private purposes.

In the course of the 16th century the 'Church Ales' (which were sometimes held, when there was no Church House, in the Churchyard, and even in the Church porch) became quite the principal source of parish income.  They were extremely popular - and the Reformers found it necessary to denounce them.  They were not, however, finally supressed until the time of the Stewarts. (James I, 1603, was the first Stewart King.)

Bishop Hobhouse drew attention to several of the old parish books (a pile of which had been placed on the table) and then said he would proceed to show how far they threw light on the fabric of the Church.  They had very little notice of the fabric before 1450 (Henry VI, 1429/61).  It was standing as its present (1883) walls tell the eye, on the same place as now, not accepting the South Porch, mentioned in 1482/3 (Edward V, 1483*).   The changes since then had only been changes of detail, such as new windows put in old walls.

* Edward V.  The Boy King, murdered in The Tower of London, uncrowned.

The Bishop said that the old Rood-Loft was pulled down and its material sold.  A Christmas Play was got up by five parishioners in aid of the new Loft.  The nett profit was only 6s.8d. but it served, perhaps, like bazaars, to kindle bounty, and other gifts flowed in.

The old Loft was probably of stone.  The breast-work was left (the sockets being filled in) to support the wooden screen and the Loft 'solarium' above.  The Wardens found the material, as was the universal custom, and made contact with a carpenter for the job (40s.), they finding him meat and service.

The whole cost of the Rood-Loft was about 55s.  There was also a row of 40 'judacis' (candlesticks), probably for purposoes of illumination.  These cast their illuminations upwards, to the Holy Cross - or rather Crucifix; and downward over the Nave.

In 1482/3 (Edward V, 1483) the ceiling over the Rood was adorned - as might be seen at Bruton Church, Somerset, and elsewhere.

There must have been an Altar to the Blessed Virgin with specal services in her honour, for in 1437 (Henry VI, 1429/61) there was an entry among the receipts - 'Pro Bonis St. M.' and there was another entry, as follows:- 'The Procurator or Steward of the Brotherhood of St. Mary begs the Wardens 100lbs. of lead.'  There must have been other Altars, for the repairs of which entries were made.  In a half sheet, bound between the Accounts of 1516/17 (Henry VIII, 1509/46) was a list of payments to masons for making the stairs in the Bell Tower (£4).  There was the outside Turret Stair-case.

The work was done under the Rector's oversight by special contributions, apparently.

His Lordship, Bishop Hobhouse, stated that the custom of selling seats in the Church (which he strongly deprecated) commenced in 1613 (James I, 1603/25).  He gave some interesting particulars respecting the Bells, which were made at Chiselborough, and in conclusion, referred to some splendid workmanship exhibited in the old oak Bench-Ends, which would, he said, have done credit to any architect.

His Lordhip resumed his seat amidst applause.

In the course of a discussion which followed, the Rev. E.F. Hopkinson said that at the date referred to by His Lordship there was a Bell-Foundry at Closworth.

The Vicar, the Rev. J.B. Hyson, said the Bookbinder, named John Bokebynder, came from Martock.  Referring back to the remark made by His Lordship that the play at Christmas realised only 6s.8d, he said the audience should understand that at that time 2s. represented the price of a cow, and 10d. the hire of a cow for a year.  So that they would see that 6s.8d. was something considerable.

Mr. Troyte-Bullock said he observed that there was a piscina in the north side of the Rood-Loft.  The Vicar said it would appear that this was the original base of the Rood-Loft.  Mr. Troyte-Bullock said it was a very curious place for a piscina.  His Lordship said that wherever they found an Altar, there they also found a piscina.

In reply to the Dean of Wells, the Rev. L. Burrows, His Lordship said he did not think there were any fixed seats (except those for the use of the aged or infirm) until the beginning of the 16th century.  A gentleman asked whether the female Churchwardens carried out the duties herself?  His Lordship replied that there was no proof to the contrary.

The Vicar said the female Churchwardens appeared to have done the work.  It was recorded that Alice Brown cut up the Cope and made it into a covering for the Altar Table (1645). (Daughter).

The Rev. Preb. Salmon, the Rev. P. Hanswell and Mr. Hansell also took part in the discussion.

Bishop Hobhouse said he had only to express the hope that this interesting fabric, whose history had thus far been elucidated, might receive as good handling from the present (1883) parishioners as it did in olden times - in the 15th and 16th centuries.  It appeared from the records that whatever the parishioners were minded to do, they did.

They did it in the old ways, by 'Church Ales' and that kind of thing, but they did it amongst themselves.  They did not go far afield to ascertain what their neighbours at a distance would do.  They put their shoulders to the wheel, they did their own work and maintained their own place of worship.

After many years of neglect the restorers of the present fabric would have a heavy business on hand, but he hoped there would be plenty of sympathy amongst Church people generally, with the people of Tintinhull, in restoring the place of worship in the village.  At the same time he had to commend to them most heartily the virtues of their forefathers in helping themselves and in setting heartily to work to bear their own burdens.  It was quite certain that their forefathers got very little help indeed outside the parish - even the Priory of Montacute, which owned all the land there, seemed to have helped them only in the very smallest degree.  Their forefathers found the means for doing what was necessary, and he must commend their example to his hearers.

He hoped the parishioners of Tintinhull might find amongst themselves the spirit which animated their forefathers to keep the House of God in a good state; and he hoped and trusted and believed that in the discharge of that duty they would receive the sympathy and assistance of their fellow-Churchmen throughout the County. (Applause.)

The Vicar, Rev. J.B. Hyson, said he was gratified to see such a large company present.  The Lecture they had heard had not only been gratifying, but interesting and instructive. (Hear. Hear.)  His Lordship had said that he hoped the people of Tintinhull would imitate their forefathers who did not go far abroad for assistance to carry on their work, but did it themselves right nobly.  He (the Vicar) was very happy  to be able to say that the people of Tintinhull would imitate their forefathers, who now had just the same spirit.  They had seen some very ancient manuscripts at that meeting, which he hoped they would inspect more closely before leaving; but he held in his hand a modern manuscript (containing a list of the subscribers to the Restoration Fund) which would show the spirit which pervaded the people of Tintinhull. (Applause.)  They had known for a long time that their Church wanted to be repaired, but the grand question for them to consider was - where is the money to come from?  The people of Tintinhull said, 'Make an effort, and we will do what we can.'  But when he looked at the Church and saw what was wanted, he felt bound to abandon the task until they had someone to come forward and help them.

A gentleman, (Mr. Sprackett)* who had property there, and who had just come to live in the parish, said, 'Let us begin.  The Church is certainly a disgrace.  I cannot think that the people can expect God to meet them in such a dirty place.  We like our own houses to be clean and comfortable, and when we go to God's House we like to be comfortable too.  But the Church at present is not fit for the lowest and poorest to go into.  I will give £100.' (Applause.)

* Mr. Sprackett.  The Poor Law Records of 1883 refer to:-
'George Sprackett of Half Way House owning 78 acres, 2 roods and 35 perches of land.'
Half Way House is on the old Fosse Wayy, now the A303.  It was here that horses were changed when 'half way' between ...?

The Vicar said that they then at once convened a Meeting, and commenced operations.